mirage

Community-park relations - How to achieve and measure success: A case study of Kibale National Park

Mak IR/Manakin Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Nankya, Rose
dc.date.accessioned 2018-06-01T00:24:19Z
dc.date.available 2018-06-01T00:24:19Z
dc.date.issued 2001-08
dc.identifier.citation Nankya, R. (2001). Community-park relations - How to achieve and measure success: A case study of Kibale National Park. Unpublished master’s thesis, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10570/6281
dc.description Thesis submitted to Graduate School in partial fulfillment for the award of a Degree of Master of Science in Environment and Natural Resources of Makerere University. en_US
dc.description.abstract Although conservationists are interested in the long-term use of resources, the communities neighbouring Protected Areas are interested in the short-term benefits. This creates problems and costs of conservation proportional to the extent of conflict between these two sets of interest. The situation in Uganda has not been different. In the case of Kibale National Park, conservation has faced the same obstacles till a pro-people approach to conservation was adopted. In order to know the effectiveness of the programme, this study was carried out in the communities neighbouring the Park with the overall objective of assessing the community-Park relations. The attitude towards the park is good although people felt that they are not yet benefiting from the Park-Community programmes. Most people are aware about the importance of conserving the park but they are blindfolded by the problems that arise from the park like crop raiding. The awareness about the wildlife policy of involving communities in park management and benefit sharing is very low despite people’s willingness to collaborate in managing the park. In spite of peoples’ knowing the law governing the management of Protected Areas, conservation still remains a challenge due to the prevailing poverty in these communities. This implies that whether legal or not, dependence on park resources by these communities will continue. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Prof. Richard Wrangham and Harvard University. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Makerere University. en_US
dc.subject National parks, Uganda en_US
dc.subject Conservation of National parks en_US
dc.subject Wildlife, Uganda en_US
dc.title Community-park relations - How to achieve and measure success: A case study of Kibale National Park en_US
dc.type Thesis/Dissertation (Masters) en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record